IMDG (Dangerous cargo) course in Kalmar 24 - 28th of April 2006.


Kalmar Maritime Academy has been training deck and engine officers for the Kalmar Maritime Academymerchant fleet since 1842. At present some 600 regular students are attending our main programmes: The Master Mariner Programme, the Chief Engineer Officer Programme and the Production Engeneering Programme. In addition approximately the same number of officers attend our in-service coures.

The newbuilt school is situated in the heart of Kalmar, next to the guest harbour water front and the famous Kalmar Castle. In this unique environment you will find state-of-the-art simulator equipment and laboratories, tailor-made classrooms and devoted teachers - all a part of a world-class maritime academy.


International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code was developed as a uniform international code for the transport of dangerous goods by sea covering such matters as packing, container traffic and stowage, with particular reference to the segregation of incompatible substances.

The development of the IMDG Code dates back to the 1960 Safety of Life at Sea Conference, which recommended that Governments should adopt a uniform international code for the transport of dangerous goods by sea to supplement the regulations contained in the 1960 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS).

First published in 1965, the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code has become the IMDG codestandard guide to all aspects of Smiley sleepinghandling dangerous goods and marine pollutants in sea transport. The IMDG-Code has undergone many changes over the years.

The 2004 edition consists of two paperback volumes and a Supplement containing several related texts.

In the IMDG code we find directions and regulations regarding dangerous cargo transported in packed form. In the IMDG code we can find directions and regulations regarding classification, packing, labeling, stowage, segregation and handling and terminology.
There is also a emergency response action.

Volume 1 contains Part 1 (General provisions, definitions, training) ; Part 2 (Classification) ; Part 4 (Packing and tank provisions) Part 5 (Consignment procedures) ; Part 6 (Construction and testing of packagings, IBCs, large packagings, portable tanks and road tank vehicles) ; Part 7 (Transport operations):
•General provisions, definitions, training
•Classification
•Packing and tank provisions
•Consignment procedures
•Construction and testing of packagings, IBCs,large packagings, portable tanks and road tank vehicles transport operations

Volume 2 contains Part 3 (Dangerous Goods List - equivalent to the schedules in previous editions of the Code, presented in tabular format - and limited quantities exceptions):
•The Dangerous Goods List
•Limited quantities exceptions
•The Index
•Appendices

The Supplement:
IMDG Code suppliment•EMS Guide
•Medical First Aid Guide
•Reporting Procedures
•Packing Cargo Transport Units
•Safe Use of Pesticides
•INF Code = The International Code for the Safe Carriage of Packaged Irradiated Nuclear Fuel, Plutonium and High-Level Radioactive Wastes on Board Ships (INF Code)

OK, as we understand all dangerous cargo has to be labeled and marked. We have the United Nations (UN) Numbers. The UN are four-digit numbers used world-wide to identify hazardous chemicals or classes of hazardous materials. These numbers generally range between 0000 and 3500 and are ideally preceded by the letters "UN" to avoid confusion with other number codes.

Associated with each UN number is a hazard identifier, which encodes the generalSmiley hazard class and subdivision (and, in the case of explosives, their compatibility group). For instance, the hazard identifier of acrylamide is 6.1 and the one of cigarette lighters is 2.1. If a substances poses several dangers, then subsidiary risk identifiers may be specified. It is not possible to deduce the hazard class(es) of a substance from its UN number: they have to be looked up in a table. It's not possible to work out the hazard class of the dangerous cargo from the UN number. We have to look in a table to find out the hazard class. Well, we can find alot of other useful information as well, hang on!

Everyone knows gasoline so let�'s see what we can find about gasoline. Hmm, what is the BIPPING UN number for Gasoline? First we look up gasoline in the Table B: Alphabetical List of Dangerous. This table we find in Part 3 of the “Regulations concerning the international Carriage of Dangerous Goods by rail”
We find that gasoline has the UN number 1203

I have taken the pictures from Part 3 of the “Regulations concerning the international Carriage of Dangerous Goods by rail”. On the ships we use the IMDG code. Part 3 in volume 2, chapter 3.2 “Dangerous Goods List DGL”, but I have no pictures of this table and I will upload this table as soon as I got pictures.
We use the UN number 1203 and we find the following in Part 3 of the “Regulations concerning the international Carriage of Dangerous Goods by rail”. We go to chapter 3.2 List of dangerous goods in UN number order and here we find that gasoline is a class 3 material.
From chapter 3.2 List of dangerous goods in UN number order

This is from Part 3 of the “Regulations concerning the international Carriage of Dangerous Goods by rail”. This information we can find in the IMDG code as well. It's a little different, but now you get the picture on how we use the books.

The hazard classes and their divisions are:
Class 1: Explosives and the divisions are:
Division 1.1: Substances and articles which have a mass explosion hazard
Division 1.2: Substances and articles which have a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard
Division 1.3: Substances and articles which have a fire hazard and either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection hazard or both, but not a mass explosion hazard
Division 1.4: Substances and articles which present no significant hazard
Division 1.5: Very insensitive substances which have a mass explosion hazard
Division 1.6: Extremely insensitive articles which do not have a mass explosion hazard
Labels for class 1 & 2
IMDG Class 1 Explosive
Class 1
IMDG Class 2.1 Flammable Gas
Class 2.1
IMDG Class 2.2 Non Flammable Toxic Gas
Class 2.2
IMDG Class 2.3 Poison Gas
Class 2.3
Class 2: Gases and the divisions are:
Division 2.1: Flammable gases
Division 2.2: Non-flammable, non-toxic gases
Division 2.3: Toxic gases
Class 3 Flammable Liquids
Labels for class 3 & 4
IMDG Class 3 Flammable Liquids
Class 3
IMDG Class 4.1 Flammable Solids
Class 4.1
IMDG Class 4.2 Spontaneously Combustible
Class 4.2
IMDG Class 4.3 Dangerous When Wet
Class 4.3

Class 4: Flammable solids* and the divisions are:
Division 4.1: Flammable solids, self-reactive substances and solid desensitised explosives
Division 4.2: Substances liable to spontaneous combustion
Division 4.3: Substances which in contact with water emit flammable gases
*Substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances which, on contact with water, emit flammable gases
Class 5: Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides
Division 5.1: Oxidizing substances
Division 5.2: Organic peroxides
Labels for class 5 & 6
IMDG Class 5.1 Oxidising Agent
Class 5.1
IMDG Class 5.2 Organic Peroxide
Class 5.2
IMDG Class 6 Poison
Class 6
IMDG Class 6.1 Toxic Substances
Class 6.1
IMDG Class 6.2 Infectious Substances
Class 6.2

Class 6: Toxic and infectious substances and the divisions are:
Division 6.1: Toxic substances
Division 6.2: Infectious substances
Class 7: Radioactive material
Radioctivity is only a potential hazards and that differ it from other dangerous goods.
A white label represent the lower risk and a yellow label is a greater radioactive hazard. The higher the red number the higher the risk.

IMDG Class 7 Radioactive Materials
Class 7
IMDG Class 7 Radioactive Materials Category 2
Class 7 Category II
IMDG Class 7 Radioactive Materials Category 3
Class 7 Category III
Class 8: Corrosive substances
Labels for class 8 & 9
IMDG Class 8 Corrosive Substances
Class 8
IMDG Class 9 Miscellaneous
Class 9

Class 9: Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles
Labels for Marine Pollutants and elevated temperatures.
Marine Pollutant
"Marine pollutant" means a substance in any concentration equal to or exceeding that specified for the substance as identified in the index to the IMDG Code by the superscript "P" or "PP".
Elevated temperature
Containers or package with liquids with a temp higher than 100°C or solids with atemperature of more than 240°Cshall be labeled with the “Elevated temperature” label.

You can entertain yourself while I'm off drinking a beer. All this writing about UN numbers, Hazard numbers and stuff had made me tired and I'm afraid that I will end up mixing all the different stuff. I can't keep track off all the different stuff anymore.

But I'm soon back with Material Safety Data Sheet and segrigation of the dangerous goods onboard


I spent the Sunday with my hangover and Monday morning it was time to go to school. Kalmar Maritime AcademyI had planned to walk to the school, but pain in my left foot forced me to go by bus. It was a gloomy and grey day with an annoying drizzle.

Our lesson started at 0855 in classroom #250 and I arrived to the school at 0830. That gave me time to buy a diet drink in the coffee shop and I had just bought me a Diet Drink when I saw the Captain from Vinga Helena entering the coffee shop.
- Hey! What are you doing here? I asked.
- I'm on the dangerous goods course, he said.
- Do you need that on a tanker?
He told me that he was now working on the ferries between Sweden and Denmark. We had a chat about the good old time and it was soon 0855.

We started right off with the IMDG code and we learned how to use the books.
Does anyone know what UN number 3408 is? For sure I don't know so let's check Chapter 3.2 in Part 3 in Volume 2 of the “IMDG code”. Chapter 3.2, the List of dangerous goods in UN number order and we find the following information about UN number 3408:
IMDG code - Dangerous Goods List
From the Dangerous Goods List in chapter 3.2 in Part 3 in Volume 2 of the “IMDG code” Column 1 - 18

UN 3408 is Lead Percholate Solution, a class 5.1 material. From column 4 we can see that the subsidary risk is 6.1. From the list above we can see that a class 5.1 is a Oxidizing substances and 6.1 is a Toxic substances. See below:
IMDG code - Dangerous Goods List
From the Dangerous Goods List in chapter 3.2 in Part 3 in Volume 2 of the “IMDG code” Column 1 - 14

In column 4 there is a “P” under the 6.1. A P means that the material is Marine pollutant.
In column 5 we can read what type of packing we need for the material. The packing has to be marked with a letter for which the design type has been successfully tested:
With an "X" for packing groups I, II and III
and a "Y" for packing groups II and III
and a "Z" for packing group III only.

A container containing UN 3408 has to be marked with the following labels: One for class 5.1 and one for
class 6.1 and as mentioned before a label with Marine Pollutant.

We have to label dangerous goods with all of the above labels. In Hazard Identification NumberEurope they have an identification system for dangerous cargo on the roads. It's an orange sign with the UN number in the bottom and the Hazard Identification Number on the top. Hazard Identification Number is indicating the danger

We don't use this on the ships, but I just mention it because we can see this labels on containers and trucks on the ships.
The hazard identification number consists of two or three figures indicating the following hazards:
2 Emission of gas due to pressure or chemical reaction
3 Flammability of liquids (vapours) and gases or self-heating liquid
Marine Pollutant

The P in column 4 means Marine Pollutant and thus we need this label as well.
4 Flammability of solids or self-heating solid
5 Oxidizing (fire-intensifying) effect
6 Toxicity
7 Radioactivity
8 Corrosivity
9 Risk of spontaneous violent reaction

Doubling of a figure indicates an intensification of that particular hazard. E.G. 3 means flammability of
So a container, trailer or a package etc with dangerous goods has to be marked with the following:
UN number and name
Class label
All sides of a container has to be marked. But its also depending on the package. A trailer only have to be marked on the sides and the back etc. If you need to know more read the IMDG code.
liquids (vapours) and gases or self-heating liquid, 33 means highly flammable liquid (flash point below 21°C)
Where the hazard associated with a substance can be adequately indicated by a single figure, this is followed by a zero.
If a hazard identification number is prefixed by letter 'X', this indicates that the substance will react dangerously with water. Click here for a list of the Hazard Identification Numbers.

EmS - this column refers to the relevant emergency schedules for FIRE and SPILLAGE in the "The EmS Guide - Emergency Response Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods".

The first EmS code refers to the relevant Fire Schedule (e.g. Fire Schedule Alfa "F-A" General Fire Schedule).

The second EmS code refers to the relevant Spillage Schedule (e.g. Spillage Schedule Alfa "S-A" Toxic Substances).

Underlined EmS codes (special cases) indicate a substance, material or article for which additional advice is given in the emergency response procedures.

For dangerous goods offered for transport under N.O.S. entries or other generic entries, the most relevant emergency response procedures may vary with the properties of the hazardous constituents. As a consequence, shippers may have to declare different EmS codes from those indicated, if, to their knowledge, such codes are more appropriate.
The provisions in this column are not mandatory.

From column 15 we can see that we find information on how to handle a fire in table F-H

From column 15 we can also see that we find information on how to handle a spill in table S-Q


Column 16Stowage and segregation - this column contains the stowage and segregation provisions as prescribed in part 7 of the IMDG code. But I'm tired and we have to talk about segregation and stowing tomorrow, my spelling gets worse and worse and we have to think about the English teacher's ileus. Well, I'm off to my bed, I have to wake up at 0600 tomorrow morning.

For a description pf all the 18 columns click here.

0600 early Tuesday morning and I was half dead when the alarm went off. I made me some Smiley newstea and a “Oatmeal Surprise ®”. I was munching on the “Oatmeal Surprise ®” and drinking my tea while watching the news on the TV

I hot shower and I left at 0700. It took me 40 minutes to walk to the school and I had time to buy 2 diet drinks before class.

During the day we learned all about the segregation of the different classes of dangerous cargo. UN haveOur classroom classified all the dangerous cargo in to classes as mentioned above.

So let's take a look on how to segregate dangerous cargo on board, this is important. We all understand that it can be very dangerous to mix dangerous cargo.
We have class 3 (Flammable liquids) goods and class 2.3 (Toxic gases) goods and we want to put it on the ship. Where can we load the goods? We have to check with the segregation table, hang on!
Segregation table
Numbers and symbols relate to the following terms as defined in this section:
1 - "Away from"
2 - "Separated from"
3 - "Separated by a complete compartment or hold from"
4 - "Separated longitudinally by an intervening complete compartment or hold from"
X - The segregation, if any, is shown in individual schedules

We enter the table at the flammable liquid row and we follow the row until we reach the class 2.3 column Overheadand we find a 2 and that means “separated from”.

The term “separated from”means a little different if it's a container ship, RO RO or a general cargo ship. It also different if you want to stow it under or on deck. But we don't have the space to explain it here, it's all in the IMDG code.

As you see in the table above we have a segregation scale from 1 - 4. An X means that we don't have to segregate the cargo unless it's specified in column 6 (Special provisions). But generally it's just to follow the segregation table.

But now you know how to find out how to segregate the dangerous cargo onboard.

0600 early Wednesday morning and I was half dead when the alarm went off. I made me some Smiley newstea and a “Oatmeal Surprise ®”. I was munching on the “Oatmeal Surprise ®” and drinking my tea while watching the news on the TV

I hot shower and I left at 0700. It took me 40 minutes to walk to the school and I had time to buy 2 diet drinks before class.

We spent the day training with the segregation table and, well, it was getting a little boring. But training is good and we have an exam on Friday. So the enthusiasm was bubbling high in the class room.

Today and tomorrow they have a, hmm, I don't know how to say it, but it's a kind of trade fair on the school with all Swedish shipping companies visiting the school.
I meet my old friend from when we were in navigation school in Gothenburg together, but this is a very long time ago. I also meet one of the riding crew from when I was in Argonaut. Now he's working for TTS

Hmm, at 1645 we were ready for the day and I left school bound for Fredriksskans IPFredriksskans IP, the soccer field in Kalmar. Malmö FF is visit the town. Playing against Kalmar soccer club.

Kick off was at 1900 so I had time for a pizza before the start. I asked the guards if there was a pizza close by and there was one 300 meters away. Well, Malmö FF is in town and it seems like all the farmers had to be seen and the restaurant was full.

I was Malmö FF's standing roomsoon back at Fredriksskans IP and the away team's (Malmö FF) standing room was at the back side of Fredriksskans IP.

It was cold, I was freezing like a dog, in a few days it's May but it must have been very close to 0°C. I was looking for someone selling supporter stuff from Malm&oumL, FF. Soccer gameI could really use a hat, muffler and some gloves.

Not a sign of anything warm and I asked around for the stuff.
- They only sell them at the home game.

1900 and the game started and soon Kalmar had to attack the players from Malmö FFMalmö and they had to come on the field with a stretcher.
But it's not easy to crack Malmö FF, but I was about to give up.

Nothing ever happened in the game and Malmö FF only had MFFone shoot on Kalmar FF's goal. It was over and the game ended nil to nil.

I had ordered a taxi 5 minutes before the game ended and I was soon home with a salad. I was disappointed after Malmö's game and I soon felt asleep. I had to wake up at 6 o'clock tomorrow morning again.

0600 early Thursday morning and I was half dead when the alarm went off. I made me some Smiley newstea and a “Oatmeal Surprise ®”. I was munching on the “Oatmeal Surprise ®” and drinking my tea while watching the news on the TV

I hot shower and I left at 0700. It took me 40 minutes to walk to the school and I had time to buy 2 diet drinks before class.

It was the last day on the course and it was also the last day for the fair on the school. I knew the Seagoing Personnel ManagersSeagoing Personnel Manager from Broström Ship Management from school. I had never meet the Seagoing Personnel Manager from Tärntank before.

I meet them yesterday for the first time, hmm, actually they recognized me!!??
I was talking with the Seagoing Personnel Manager from Broström when the Personnel Manager from Tärntank came over.
- Is your name Aladdin?

Well, I'm used to it by now. Later on the Personnel Co-ordinator from Laurin Maritime came over to me and asked:
- Is it Aladdin?

She had been working in Tärntank 5 years ago when I was working there, but now she was working in Kajplatsen 4Laurin Maritime. We talked about the good old time and she asked me to call her.

For me it was very nice to meet them, I have talked a lot with this two girls but I never had a face to put on the voice.

This was our last day and thus our last lunch at the restaurant “Kajplatsen 4” on the school.

Tomorrow it's just to do the exam and I hope to be home long before lunch time so I can eat my salad.

0600 early Friday morning and I was half dead when the alarm went off. I made me some Smiley newstea and a “Oatmeal Surprise ®”. I was munching on the “Oatmeal Surprise ®” and drinking my tea while watching the news on the TV

I hot shower and I had planned to leave at 0700. Hmm, I was uploading some new stuff on my iPod and it took longer than I had expected. I didn't manage to leave until 0715, but I was in time for the exam. I even had time to buy a diet drink before the class.

I finished the exam at 0835 and our teacher gave me the result after 10 minutes. We need 60% to pass and I had 100%, hmm, I would have been disappointed with less.



                  


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